Warren Buffet Will Donate 90 Million To People Of Color

A Buffett family foundation will devote $90 million to supporting girls of color

The NoVo Foundation is making a big commitment.Image: alex wong/Getty Images
By Emma Hinchliffe2017-04-13 15:55:47 UTC

Warren Buffett does most of his philanthropic giving through the Bill Melinda Gates Foundation — eradicating diseases and supporting communities in the developing world. 
A new philanthropic endeavor from Buffett’s son is bringing that giving closer to home. The NoVo Foundation, established by the Omaha billionaire as a charitable trust, will devote $90 million over the next seven years to support young women and girls of color in the United States. 

Peter Buffett and his wife Jennifer Buffett, will distribute the $90 million through the NoVo Foundation. The foundation, which works on advancing adolescent girls’ rights, ending violence against girls and women, helping local economies, supporting Indigenous communities, and researching social and emotional learning, first announced its $90 million commitment a year ago. 
Since then, the nonprofit has talked to advocates and communities about how to ensure the funding is put to its best use. In practice, the money will go to community-based organizations, to communities in the Southeast, and to policy and research groups working on issues related to the lives of women and girls of color. The foundation expects to award about $13 million in its first year. 

The influx of funding for initiatives in the Southeast could be a big deal, since the foundation chose the region after seeing it had often been ignored by philanthropy. 
Community groups, local organizers, and advocates on the policy side can all apply for grants over the next few weeks. 

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Human Conditions Improving at a Remarkable Rate

On a number of previous occasions, I have written about the extent of human progress around the world, but the remarkable speed of improvements in the state of humanity should not go unnoticed. To that end, I have looked at some of the most important indicators of human wellbeing, especially in the poor countries, over the last decade (or, when the latest data is not available, ten years prior to the last data point). The results are encouraging and ought to give us reason for 7:00 am

3.14.17 7:00 am

3.07.17 8:50 GDP per capita in real 2010 dollars (2005-2015)
Global: $8,858 → $10,194 or a 15.1 percent Africa (SSA): $1,363 → $1,660 or a 21.8 percent increase
India: $982 → $1,751 or a 78.3 percent increase
China: $2,738 → $6,498 or a 137.3 percent increase
2. Infant mortality (i.e., children under age of 1) per 1,000 live births (2005-2015)
Global: 44.3 → 31.7 or a 28.4 percent decline
SSA: 80 → 56.4 or a 29.5 percent decline
India: 55.8 → 37.9 or a 32.1 percent decline
China: 20.3 → 9.2 or a 54.7 percent decline
3. Life expectancy (2004-2014)
Global: 69 → 71.5 or a 3.6 percent increase
SSA: 52 → 58.6 or a 12.7 percent increase
India: 64.2 → 68 or a 5.9 percent increase
China: 73.4 → 75.8 or a 3.3 percent increase
4. Depth of the food deficit, kilocalories per person per day (2006-2016)*
Global: 129 → 88.4 or a 31.5 percent decline